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"always on," which looks at how mobile technologies are influencing the way we write or read come to speak of. this interview is conducted at american university in washington d.c. >> fs or trade to come the technology is changing how we communicate. >> guest: yes and no. there's this assumption that the tape knowledge she had computers and mobile phones are changing the ways we write to each other because we're supposedly using abbreviations and acronyms and emoticons. if you're a young teenage girl you're using a blog. there may be a handful of these kinds of shorthand and emoticons commonly used. not nearly as many as the press would have you believe. what is changing is the way you read, the ways we write. i'll tell you what they mean by that in a second. our social relationships are changing incredibly and i'm going to suggest our personal individual psyches are changing. so let's start with how we read. it's pretty clear is what you read things on the screen, whether it's a laptop or even reader for tablet computer or mobile phone company don't go quite this family as you do
was the intersection of film technology -- technology with an emphasis on social change. >> host: your dedication page reads in part to my mother and father the greatest boomers i know. let's talk about that generation for a minute because they get some flack for some mistakes that they made and have made. >> guest: i think the boomer generation was an incredibly and is an incredibly important generation and our nations history. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement which they played a leading role in pushing out forward and ending the war in vietnam and changing the way we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create up star movements. i think all that was incredibly important and the beginning of the women's movement all that great activism that it produced and all of that we are seeing that directly play out today whether it's the election of barack obama or the continued advancement of women in congress so all that is a direct result of their activis
ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city go
improve the taxi market by placing more caps on the street, working with existing technology providers. >> thank you. >> (calling names) >> good afternoon. >> also it's not going to be relevant to the subject, i thought we would be discussing the issue of having electronic weigh bills which is finished and done with, i want to express my opposition; we don't need anybody to bake through our information; it is not fair to have our financial data access by third parties or more. and we really think that by doing that process, it's nothing but adding another stress to what you have already seen here, with poor men working for their families; it's going to be another burden for them. i am sorry but // thank you very much. >> mark gruber, -- >> thank you. mark gruber. united taxicab workers. we desperately need electronic taxicab access. it should be done in the form of a single app put out my contract through an rfp instead of having some multitude of apps fighting among each other. you might have gotten a glimmer from the taxi magic representative. this is something that needs to be d
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
and process that information or to lay down a memory. we don't know how that works. with technology yet to be invented so a lot of this is going to be technology development and nano technology, what we aim to do is to be able to record from thousands maybe hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same time and be able therefore to understand how these circuits work. that's the brain activity map that's being talked about. very early days we don't have a scientific plan yet about milestones and timetables and costs but it's getting to be a very exciting moment to put something together that we couldn't have thought of. >> more with nih director dr. france sess collins tonight at 8:00. now, president obama speaks to students in israel after meetings with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. and he reaffirmed his commitment to israel and discussed security concerns and the road to peace in the middle east. this is about an hour. >> well, it is a great honor to be with you here and i'm so grateful for the welcome that i've received from the people of israel. i bring with me the support of
. the debt ceiling. so we only have one out-perform rating right now, which is technology. that's been a long-standing outperform for us. one underperform was consumer discretionary which is the potential for problems because of the tax increases. it turns out it's not having the impact on consumer spending as a lot of people thought. >> great advice. thank you so much. great to you on the prom. liz ann sonders and heidi moore joining me. up next, we're on the money. what is starbucks' recipe for success? my conversation with the company's founder and ceo about how he wants to do for tea what he has done for coffee. >>> and how health care may not be so healthy a business. >>> and later, talking tough on the smartphone market. can a new phone from a glass economy not so far away take a bite out of apple? what innovation means for your personal technology use, as we take a look at how the stock market ended for the week. back in a moment. >>> welcome back. president obama pushing for an increase in the minimum wage to $9 an hour. but business is debating the unintended consequences of such a m
.c. >> american universe repress or naomi, technology changing how we communicate? >> yes and no. there's this assumption that the technologies of computers and now mobile phones are changing the way that we write to each other. because the postal using all these abbreviations and acronyms and emoticons, you actually study we are not using all that many. if you're a young teenage girl you will be using a lot. there's many handful of these kind of motor comes early, leave but not nearly as many as the press latest deadly. it's the ways in which we read, the ways in which we write, and onto what i mean by that and the second. our social relationships are changing incredibly. and i'm going to suggest a personal individual psyche are changing as well. spent walk us through those. >> let's start with how we read. what's critically is that when you're reading things on the screen, you don't do it -- of ice cream a member -- i mean whether it's a laptop, computer, tablet computer or whether its mobile phone, you don't do quite the same way when you're reading hardcopy. in fact that's a subject
in general terms about the technologically brilliant qualities of [speaker not understood] which we generally experience as print on paper, including books. there is the integrity of the text which can't easily be altered, certainly can't be hacked. and the changes, if there are any, would be very noticeable on paper as compared with electronic or online text. there is accountability generally speaking with book. we know who the author is. we know that there's been some editing and a publishing house putting it out. many online materials are simply not clear as to who the authors or editors or publishers might be. there is the quality of privacy. no one knows what you're reading when you go into a library. nobody certainly knows what page you're on or which entry you're reading. online all of those things can and in many cases are being tracked in minutest detail. there is permanence. one can routinely read a 20, 40, 100 year old book with no problem at all. that might be very difficult with some of the electronic materials. and finally, the universal accessibility, only the eyes are needed t
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
was she was telling us to go forward 2030 in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we'
; the technology, already exists. it could be an existing app maker who plugs in and goes from 700 cabs to 1700 cabs; it could be a new player. that part we would not control the timeline but given what we have seen in terms of the demand for this kind of way to access transportation, and we're fairly confident that that would happen fairly quickly. >> mine is quick. director heinicke covered most of the things i want to talk about. thank you for the research; you have made a lot of progress. congratulations to you and your staff. >> thank you. >> i want to go back to mr. -- made the point when he invested a lot of money in apps, i think director reiskin said, even if they invested in apps, they can be used in open architecture. have you taken into consideration what is out there? >> it is appropriate to allow companies that have a pride in their brand, to develop their own apps; if they want to offer and app with only their taxis, we should allow that exist. we don't want to interfere with that brand. we want people to be able to get taxis a lot easier than they can today. >> nothing preclude
facial toning tool for home that uses the same technology aestheticians use? and what if i told you it costs half the price of the department store brand and it works in half the time? and what if i told you that instead of getting just one tool, you'll get two, for half the price? serious skincare has turned the beauty world and gravity upside down with their most advanced age-defying breakthrough yet. in 15 minutes or less per day, you can tone, smooth, firm and tighten and sculpt your entire face and your neck using our tools, both sides at the same time. so stay with us because today, on the latest edition of breaking beauty news, you'll discover something that never existed before-- a personal trainer for your face! you're gonna want to try it. [♪...] >> hi, i'm jennifer flavin-stallone. for the past 22 years, serious skincare's brought you fabulous products. but, as you know, even the most advanced skincare can't actually lift and tone the contours and muscles of the face. i'm really excited because what you're about to see today is definitely the biggest beauty breakthrough
times and technology and many faces have changed since president reagan was in office, some important fundamentals, those that speak to who we are as americans, have not. i believe that our guest today, governor jeb bush, understands this. and it's one of the reasons that after having left office just about six years ago he remains an extremely important national voice in the republican party. as we prepare to welcome the governor to the stage, let's first take stock in a handful of issues that we know were of vital portion to ronald reagan and square them up against the words and deeds of jeb bush on those same critical topics today. so what are the fundamental issues? well, with taxes we know ronald reagan spent much of his life trying to cut them for the average american. he was convinced that it was the man or woman on the street who knew how to spend their dollar more wisely than a distant federal government, and he did all in his power to prove it by cutting taxes. when governor jeb bush was in office, he cut taxes on floridians by $20 billion. let's talk about the size of gover
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. now each time we have a meeting we try to do some new training or talk about the technology available, i will talk about the technology in my class this afternoon. it's really good because we document it because when you go to court, you can show training on a monthly basis. conferences, i can't tell you how excited i am these are happening. only in the last two or three years have these major conferences come about. the one up in canada, they were a great group of conferences and other people started to pick up on this. when i became an officer dealing with gravanis in 1991, there were no conferences and there was virtually no interest. as dr. spicer mentioned, every time it got good, i foupld myself out of a job. i was out of a job for about 6 months because it fell apart and then came back together. mer and more cities are realizing gravanis is a pattern crime and as dr. spicer pointed out, it's a great way crime to many other activities. so you can wind up precluding with a lot of other stuff by dealing with them when they are down to the part doing gravanis damage before th
everybody would agree with me -- the technology fee we already have smart phones so we don't need anymore technology i think that's it thank you very much. good afternoon you are very intelligent people sitting in the panel i bought my medallion 3 years ago and after 3 years i bought my house which is almost 350 thousand dollars. i've been driving a taxi for the last 23 years and the rule was the people on the list they would get the permit now after the mta changed the rule but i was leasing before from the yellow and i think that i have not been rewarded i have been punished after 23 years serving the people of san francisco and that is not fair and now i heard that they are going to issue the permits for 250 thousand dollars. they have issued permits for free they have 8000 for free and why i have to pay 250 thousand dollars if you have to issue the permits for 150 thousand dollars then i am requesting also to reduce my price also thank you very much. applause. >> somebody else? >> good afternoon. >> good afternoon. i start driving from 1979 and i think the central app. because j
this technology because right now flywheel isn't 700 cabs on that app, i asked people, how long did you wait for this ride, saturday night? 9-10 minutes. it can imagine with 1700 we are going to solve a big demand issue assuming you want to solve the demand issue; you don't want to just throw medallions of the problem. this is a holistic approach, a way to solve the demand issue. we needed to be done right. we need a app that works right. we can do it. it's about time. thank you. (applause) (calling names) the last person who turned in a speaker card. >> i support having an electronic taxi access system, where all the cabs are on one app. it's time for the companies to stop preventing this because they want the particular app or dispatch service. i don't know. i work for yellow. i don't think you have a good dispatch system. all the dispatch systems could be improved but i really think that we need something to compete with all these other apps, and we need to get rid of all of these apps facilitating illegal cabs. i'm not sure why you can't do that. i agree with mary's point. if you will
industry. that's the science, technology, engineering and math. she is a scientist at one of the leading biotechnology companies. she is the founder of next gene girls. this was started at the grassroots, an organization commit today empowering young women for under represented communities to see themselves in science by introducing the girls to the wonders and the many -- to wonder of the many different scienceses such as engineering, technology and math professions. this is a visionary woman i set before you and it is a privilege to be able to honor her. but a little bit about who she is. she was born in the most beautiful part of san francisco. she was reared in the most wonderful promising talented part of san francisco. and without any further ado, you guys probably guess it had. that's bayview hunters point. you got to give the lady some credit. so, mom and dad, thank you very much for raising outstanding woman. (applause) >> now, ms. jackson, she understands the roadblocks and challenges many of our young people face when it comes to growing up in a challenged community around suc
of small business technology.com and took part in the festival. he's author of the new book "the facebook good to small business market i marketing." and a entrepreneur who focuses on social, mobile, and digital advertising and author of the new book "the startup playbook." you were both there. great to see you guys. >> thank you for having us. >> you are sort of our reporters out on the scene of south by southwest without even knowing it at the time. >> exactly. >> let me start with you, ramone. you've been on the show before. you know our audience. what was so interesting for small business owners? what did you learn? >> i learned a couple of things. one, small business owners who weren't there, you miss add great opportunity just to work with people. if you go to the sessions, there's a diversity of sessions from social media to technology to mobility to business growth that i think those are the things small businesses should go from. one session i went to was all about how to tell a story or a narrative as opposed to telling the story and so that was interesting, a whole hour about n
technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic i
a memory. we do not know how that works. a lot of this will be technology development. a lot of it will be nano- technology. we want to look at london's of thousands of brain cells at the same time to understand -- look at hundreds of thousands of plant cells at the same time. we do not have a scientific plan about milestones. it is getting to be an exciting moment to put something together that we cannot have thought of. nih director on c-span plus some "q & a." ofyou have been out commission since 2006. the chairman has been on since 2009. will we expect some turnover with the commission? >> we all have staggered terms. the past years have flown by quickly. we will see. i get asked this question every couple years. i am thinking about it, but we will see. i have thought about this several times, what comes after the commission. as a limited government position, we should not stay in these positions forever. i love my job. we have a lot of imported work to do. there weret week, resignations announced from the fcc. we spoke with a commissioner before his announcement. hear it
network. coming up, look at the biggest ideas in tech. the big headlines in technology including a new address app that could be a must-have for you. we'll tell you what that is, and blackberry's ceo says apple's iphone is out of date? this is te new blackberry hitting store shelfs today in the united states. will the writers be wrong? we'll debate it. plus, we'll hear from you as well. stay uned. stay uned. ♪ ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. shibani: blackberry larching its first touch screen device today in the united states, the z10. will the release of this device be the turning point for the companyythat is in a lot of need of a turn around. is it too little too late? joining me is a senior research analyst, and, ramone, great to have you on today for the launch day for blackberry, and the "wall street journal" called this a flop already. the reason is that they didn't see much promotion at at&t stores selling the device, it was in the back of the store, and what do you think of that? >> i
in tech. the big headlines in technology including a new address app that could be a must-have for you. we'll tell you what that is, and blackberry's ceo says aple's iphone is out of date? this is the new blackberry hitting store shelfs today in the united states. will the writers be wrong? we'll debate it. plus, we'll hear from you as well. stay tuned. ♪ thank you orville and wilbur... ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. shibani: blackberry larching its first touch screen device today in the united states, the z10. will the release of this device be the turning point for the companyythat is in a lot of need of a turn around. is it too little too late? joining me is a senior research analyst, and, ramone, great to have you on today for the launch day for blackberry,
it backfired! hello? the words are going this way-there's no way. oh, the lights came on. isn't technology supposed to make life easier? at chase we're pioneering innovations that make banking simple. deposit a check with a photo. pay someone with an email. and bank seamlessly with our award-winning mobile app. take a step forward... and chase what matters. >> we've all done something pretty embarrasing to impress a crush. but a man in arkansas really over did it when he staged an over-the-top plan that backfired! tyler siegel took his crush, brianne coots to a jonesboro nature center trail to talk. when suddenly they were attacked by an unknown assailant. listen to the 9-1-1 call brianne made. but brianne noticed that something about the way siegel had been acting.
of the speakers said the technology is here it's been here for a while frankly we're behind the game on this so i'm happy to be bringing this forward i wish we had brought this forward 2 years ago this is what will help us strengthen and make more efficient use of the taxis that are already on the street and i realize that the packet for this item is thick but you will note the report is about 4 substantive pages.
is on the test. >> host: has personal technology changed? >> yes. probably for the better but me before the words that we have to compete with these other students' attention they have their cell phones, the smart phones there are other things they could do and we need to compete with that but we can use technology to bring the outside world into the classroom we have these great monitors to give them a test of the classroom with what is happening in the real world. >> is it important to give letter grades? >> guest: 42? i don't know if it is that important. i don't find it to be as useful as others might but students want them because that is what they're used to and they have been competing for that and they think that is what employers want but i think we get more out of me writing evaluations talking about a strength and weaknesses and like a letter of recommendation verses a letter grade. >> host: to find a difference those taking out student loans are those who have parents pay for it? >> guest: i do find a difference between those who work and those who don't. this is their money if they d
not know how it works. a lot of this will be technologies that will be devout. a lot of this will be nano technologies. we need to be able to record thousands of brain cells at the same time and understand how the circuits work. that is a brain at to the map that is being talked about. we do not really have a map for , but it is is an exciting moment to put something together. nih directorthe dr. francis collins sunday night on c-span's "q&a." >> now actress mariska hargitay talks about efforts to help survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, and child abuse. svu."tar of "law and order: this is under an hour. >> i am so honored and thrilled to be here today. thank you, angela. reminding me of the old days. [laughter] my heart is beating, and it is such an honor, thrilled to be here for so many reasons. i just came from standing with the vice president and attorney general holder at a press conference to highlight the dire and immediate need to reduce domestic violence homicides. and now here i am with all of you in washington dc, a very exciting day. the kind of day that makes your
? is it about ideas and times we live in? is it about the use of technology, and what do you think is the biggest driver for the sort of turmoil within the republican party? >> i think is generational. we went from three losing, 1980, 1984, 1988 -- not 2000. >> we only came in first place. >> it is generational. as these parties to look at the electorate, the democratic changes that are undergoing in our country, i think there is a dying breed of republicans that i grew up with, the conservative business, low-tax republicans, and it is a natural generational fight, and i agree, i hope they continue to battle it out until after we get a woman in the white house and do some other things. then you all come back from the dead in 2050. when the maya predicted the world would end in 2012, they were talking about republicans. whet o ggoi see the democratic party, e have enormous challenges as i see the democratic party, we have enormous challenges as well. i do not like the fact that my native south has a lot of republican governors. i like to make sure that the party is competitive in th
because they were in the pilfering their technology to syria. they have a carbon copy of their nuclear weapons program. deployed probably should have been continued. it is probably the case that it would head presented them with a choice of giving up that program in compromising or staying the course and facing the implosion. the situation today is much more dire for the regime. i have been in north korea. people leaving or career is one of having no confidence any longer. an ever smaller circle of people. on top of that we had very provocative behavior now they're calling into question his judgment on the part of people in north korea. certainly antagonizing this. causing discomfort. if the board to employ these controls -- if they were going to employ these controls and step up on the anti- proliferation initiative is we selfn place before where korea and other countries were stopping -- south korea and other countries were stopping ships that were bringing the , one of therts things they do is drugs, missile parts, armaments, of those ships on the high seas. you have cut all the mea
want, having fun and enjoying the people you love. based on the same technology nasa's been studying for over 20 years to promote cell growth and healing in space, newsweek magazine hails, light therapy "can boost the body's own natural healing process." cbs news in los angeles reports, "navy seals use light therapy in the field daily..." light relief uses medical grade light emitting diodes or leds to create a safe powerful stream of warm therapeutic healing light that penetrates deep, opening capillaries, increasing circulation, relieving pain where you need it, when you need it. imagine pain relief without messy creams and gels, prescriptions, pills, injections or refills. and the only side effect is how good light relief makes you feel. it's great for back pain, arthritis, tension headaches, bursitis, tennis elbow, hip and joint pain, muscle strains and spasms, stiffness and tendonitis. it can even help relieve stubborn chronic pain. just imagine what it can do for everyday aches and pains.
around the same product. you still have government supervisors, identical technology, identical procedures, they don't seem to think it's going to save us that much money. so, just a question of whose pocket the paycheck is coming out of. >> it's not only saving, it's improving efficiency. privatization bet center >> hand it to the airlines. if american airlines doesn't protect its passengers it goes out of business. if the tsa doesn't protect the passengers it gets more funding. we have an incentive problem. in the private sector you are forced to do better. in the government you are rewarded. >> bill, do incentives matter here as they do most places? >> maybe but i say no, don't give privatization a bad name by assigning it an activity which is an expensive mess no matter who undertakes it. i would rather have john and steve use their powers of persuasion and libertarian instincts to apply to another need. privatize elementary schools. >> a subject for another conversation. we'll have that conversation. mike, by the way to clarify to, the tsa denied wrong doing with this marin
? the words are going this way-there's no way. oh, the lights came on. isn't technology supposed to make life easier? at chase we're pioneering innovations that make banking simple. deposit a check with a photo. pay someone with an email. and bank seamlessly with our award-winning mobile app. take a step forward... and chase what matters. >>> some people call what's coming this way nuisance rain. if you have allergies, it won't be a soos answer at all. >> the good news is it will carry that allergen forecast a little bit down over the next couple days. we won't be looking at extreme allergies except tomorrow. it will be another dry day. temperatures, very seasonal. we'll climb back into the lower 70s inland. at the coast, lower 60s. very similar to the very exact same weather pattern we had today. high pressure in control. the temperatures are cooling. very nicely into the 40s. still holding on to the low 60s. here is our next series of storm systems we're tracking. they're still 900 miles out into the pacific. here's the first one. that will impact us by the upcoming week and the second one
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.s. government and let it do what it needs to do. it's in the middle of a massive technology change. it's obviously becoming obsolete and instead, it's going to be a death by a thousand cuts if the government continues to go at it this way. but we tie it down, right. and i think they get a bum wrap and they have to deliver everywhere. nonef these private enterprises have to. they have to deliver to any obscure tent in the middle of nowhere, their obligation with the law. >> that's a key demo. >> i know. and tucked away in an obscure-- >> and what do you make, is that the problem there? they're mandated to lose money. >> thurman dated to lose money, but i think the story gets back here to the overarcing story about washington having a spending problem and it's got a spending addiction out ofhis world. are you kidding me? you cannot fix this addiction, it's a combination of a spending addiction and a power play, and-- >> what do they think? what do they tell the moves, you're making us look bad? i don't understand. >> the military generals say we don't need that tank, don't need that bomb
technology. what i want to do with you is to show you what i have done that has been successful for me to get vandals arrested. and what we did is pretty good. we use a couple things. anybody ever heard of graffiti tracker? you haven't? awesome program, right. if you guys don't have graffiti tracker yet, we're going to talk about graffiti tracker. that's one of the biggest things i use. when i first came to this detail, i was a body hate crimes school violence detector when i first came to this detail. next thing they said, budget cuts. they got rid of school violence for some reason and then gave me graffiti. i was like, ah, hell no, graffiti? [laughter] >> hey, when you work the road, you get that hot
dramatic is taking shape here as it relates to particularly the impact of technology is having on the world we're living in. we're living in a fish bowl. the whole idea of holding back information and keeping that information for those [speaker not understood] those in power, those days are over. age of amateurs, big is getting small, small is getting big. this democracy of voices, new contours of a new society, truly i think is being shaped. and, so, you are a big part of that. and i hope the spirit of engagement, civil grand jurors across the state, is respected in that light. as a supervisor, i was a big champion of you. as a marry was a little more cautious because -- [laughter] >> [speaker not understood]. but increasingly, i hope people understand that the roilof a civil grand jury is not gotcha. it's not about taking shots, it's not about exposing people or systems. just for the purpose of an expose. it's about an improvement it's about transparency, about accountability, and ultimately it's about trust. one thing i think we all can agree on is trust in government is not where it nee
policy. one of the things interesting is at this convention we see new products and technologies being brought forward. in my 25 years as a building inspector this is the most interesting. where something has changed. this is fire-proof paint they're demonstrating here. the building at the end, and the building at this end were both filled with some material, wood and excelier and stuff to start a fire. they lit them at the same time. four or five minutes ago. the building on the end is painted with regular latex paint on everybody's house. the building next to that is painted with latex paint. >> that is catching fire now. >> we can simulate the fire spread from house to house. and we anticipate unfortunately again. the next 2 buildings are coated with the fireproof paint. many companies make this stuff. this is a particular brand made international fire resistance. >> they were generous to do the mock up for us. >> they have done this at the request of the building department. we have seen that the building at the end, just painted with latex paint is just about gone. the building
have more monitoring centers, more of tomorrow's technology right here today, and more value. 24/7 monitoring against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide starting at just over $1 a day. and now get adt installed for just $99. isn't your family worth america's number-one security company, adt? our girls got us thinking, but the break-in g us calling. and after buying two of everything, it was nice to only need one security system -- adt. [ male announcer ] get adt installed for just $99. and ask about adt pulse, advanced home management here today. adt. always there. >> president obama this week tapped thomas perez as his next labor secretary in a move that could make a contentious battle. perez who heads the civil rights division at the justice department will have questions to answer, but the doj's decision to drop that now infamous voter intimidation case against the new black panther party, as well as a case headed to the supreme court that could have struck down his legal theories on racial discrimination, for more we're joined by editorial board member mary k
and painful. most technological advances do not come out of the party apparatus. ey come out as howard dean had social networking, and barack obama took that to different levels in 2012. >> rand paul had a speech on immigration that even marco rubio praised. >> rand paul is, to me, representing what republicans ought to be doing, and not what priebus is talking about. paul called the harvard university business school and asked for an opportunity to talk to the students about the future of the republican party and the african-american community on april 10. he is not waiting to get the nomination and then put together the outreach programs. he is doing it now. he is doing this on a number of fronts. this is what the republican party has to do. not just worry about the mechanicof the campan. >> i am all for idealizing, idolizing rand paul. this is a fella who has re- created himself. this is the new rand paul. when he ran for senate three years ago, what did he run on? he ran on an electrical wire across the southern border, helicopters and the repeal of birthright citizenship. now is a born
areas we addressed in the easier areas which is , utilizing, sensors the technology that we have. we have areas in arizona right haswhere the border patrol a gate where they can come across because they kept cutting the fence. it is not a big fence, it is a barbed wire fence. a made a gate so they can walk through. , sohe fence is not working your solution is to build another fence? >> no, you have to look at it in perspective. they cannot put things against it. went it is him -- when it is monitored, it works. when you look at the san diego border, we pretty much controlled that. we have good monitoring, we do not have much coverage coming across. we have not done everywhere else. we are saying it is too hard. -- it is not just dancing. , it isood intelligence utilizing a multipronged approach. control our we can borders. we have chosen not to. measure would be your when determining when the border is secured him a some time -- secured, some concrete numbers? congress would make that decision every year. are we maintaining the border? have we done what we need to do? i do not want t
that information, or to lay down a memory. we don't know how that works. that technology is yet to be invented, a lot of this will be technology development. a lot will be nanotechnology. what we aim to do is record, from maybe hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same time. be able, therefore, to understand how the circuits work. that is the brain activity map that is being talked about. very early days, not even a scientific plan at about milestones and time tables and cost. it is getting to be an exciting moment to put something together that we could not have thought of. >> more with nih director, dr. francis collins, sunday on "q&a." >> now, actress mariska hargitay speaks to the national press club about her work with survivors of domestic violence and child abuse. the star of "law & order: svu" is also the founder of the joyful foheart foundation. this is just under one hour. am so honored and thrilled to be here today. thank you, angela. reminding me of the old days. [laughter] my heart is beating, and it is such an honor, thrilled to be here for so many reasons. i just came fro
such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad to talk about that today. but i do believe these connections are important for us and will be so going forward into the future. members of the committee, i will conclude by saying again, thank you on behalf of the men and women of u.s. european command. thank you for the support of this committee. i will pass your thanks onto them as well. i look forward to answering your question this morning. >> thank you very much. from admiral stavridis to general jacoby. >> thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today. it is a pleasure to be here with my friends and fellow combatants i am not as big of an army guy as john is. but we are here to protect. i appreciate this committee and the continued support of our important missions. includes homeland defense, and that is our number one priority mission. it is a mission which we work closely with canada in our fully integrated national comma
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